Monthly Archives: November 2016

How Big Data Is Used To Fight Cyber Crime And Hackers – Forbes

Attempts by hackers to bring down online systems and compromise valuable data are on the rise. Just last month, one of the largest distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks ever launched was responsible for making the internet unusable across large parts of the USA, and services at Twitter, Netflix and many other places were forced offline.

These attacks are sometimes carried out to steal data. By breaking the systems through hitting them with brute force traffic, they potentially make them more vulnerable to more targeted attacks. Sometimes they are carried out as a warning shot – a show of strength to let someone know that the attacker is serious and has cyber-firepower at their fingertips.

By all estimates, attacks of this type as well as many other forms of cyber-attack are likely to continue to increase in size and frequency. Fortunately for the law-abiding, as online criminals get smarter, so

Read more at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2016/12/01/how-big-data-is-used-to-fight-cyber-crime-and-hackers-fascinating-use-case-from-bt/

New ‘Rule 41’ makes government web surveillance easier

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A new government ruling that goes into effect Thursday will make it easier for law enforcement to hack into your computer.

The controversial measure called Rule 41 is a change brought by the FBI hoping to bring more cyber criminals to justice. It will allow any judge to issue a warrant to remotely access computers located in any jurisdiction. However, critics of the rule say it’s unconstitutional and invades citizens’ rights to privacy.

“What Rule 41 allows is for the Department of Justice to go to one judge anywhere in the country and get an order to hack into millions of computers,” said Jeffrey Mittman, executive director of the ACLU of Missouri. “The ability to circumvent the expectation of privacy that we have as Americans, is really, the door is flung wide open.”

It’s possible that through Rule 41 American citizens would have government surveillance hacking their

Read more at: http://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/new-rule-41-makes-government-web-surveillance-easier

New ‘Rule 41’ makes government web surveillance easier – KSHB.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – A new government ruling that goes into effect Thursday will make it easier for law enforcement to hack into your computer.

The controversial measure called Rule 41 is a change brought by the FBI hoping to bring more cyber criminals to justice. It will allow any judge to issue a warrant to remotely access computers located in any jurisdiction. However, critics of the rule say it’s unconstitutional and invades citizens’ rights to privacy.

“What Rule 41 allows is for the Department of Justice to go to one judge anywhere in the country and get an order to hack into millions of computers,” said Jeffrey Mittman, executive director of the ACLU of Missouri. “The ability to circumvent the expectation of privacy that we have as Americans, is really, the door is flung wide open.”

It’s possible that through Rule 41 American citizens would have government surveillance hacking their

Read more at: http://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/new-rule-41-makes-government-web-surveillance-easier

Modified Mirai botnet could infect five million routers

The open source Mirai botnet code has evolved beyond attacking IoT devices and the new variant of Mirai has been…

How A Trump Presidency Will Erode Cyber Privacy And National Security

President-elect Donald Trump leaves the clubhouse following a full day of meetings at Trump International Golf Club on November 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Last Monday evening, President-Elect Donald Trump released a video in which he promised to work with the Department of Defense and Joint Chiefs of Staff on a “plan to protect Americas’ vital infrastructure from cyber attacks.” This promise reflects Trump’s ignorance of how cyber warfare works — calling in the Marines to secure the nation’s computers is about as effective as killing malware with a firearm.

On the vast, interdependent internet, evolving technologies and best practices must be adopted across the ecosystem for anyone to be secure. An effective cyber defense requires long, hard years of continued investment in research, education, strong encryption, standards, regulations, enforcement, and global cooperation. Unfortunately, Trump’s stated policy goals promise to halt and even reverse the hard-fought progress made

Read more at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/valleyvoices/2016/11/30/how-a-trump-presidency-will-erode-cyber-privacy-and-national-security/

Teen sentenced for cyber-bullying

A Yorkton teen found out this week that all the warnings about cyber-bullying and criminality are not just idle talk.

The girl, who cannot be named because she is under the age of 18 received 12 months probation for sharing a photo of another girl, who also cannot be named pursuant to a publication ban.

During a sentencing hearing November 28, the Court heard the victim had given the picture to the accused under the condition that it be kept private. The nature and content of the photo was never described in court.

After receiving a complaint, police arrested the suspect, who was released on conditions, one of which was to delete the photo. Instead, she kept it and showed it to a group of people at a party. After being arrested again for breaching the original release conditions she was released again on conditions, this time including a ban on possessing or

Read more at: http://www.yorktonthisweek.com/news/local-news/teen-sentenced-for-cyber-bullying-1.3470069

Minn. man busted for twisted ‘sextortion’ scheme gets 38 years

A Minnesota man was sentenced to 38 years in prison Tuesday for running a “sextortion” scheme — entrapping teen boys to send him nude photos he later posted online.

Anton Martynenko’s victims were primarily high school athletes between the ages of 14 and 16.

Martynenko would search for his victims on high school sport websites, posing as a female modeling agency manager and tricking them into sending him sexually explicit photos and videos, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

One of the victims was 15 years old when Martynenko first contacted him, posing as Courtney Jansgen and promising a $1,000 modeling gig.

State Department employee accused in ‘sextortion’ case

In a following message Martynenko offered the boy $300 for oral sex. Upon the boy’s refusal the pictures began to “spread like wildfire” throughout the Internet, the victim testified Tuesday, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

According to prosecutors, Martynenko had

Read more at: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/minn-man-busted-twisted-sextortion-scheme-38-years-article-1.2892976

What to do if you’re a victim of ‘sextortion’

Cases of “sextortion” have more than doubled in the UK in the past year and four men have taken  their own lives after being targeted by criminals online, according to figures released by the police. 

“Sextortion” is a form of blackmail where victims are befriended online by criminals using a fake identity who then persuade them to perform sexual acts in front of a webcam. 

Using an attractive woman to entice the victim, organised crime croups then threaten to share videos with victims’ friends and family unless they agree to pay a huge sum of money. 

The National Crime Agency (NCA), which investigates these cases, said some of the victims were as young as 14. The highest percentage of those affected were men aged between 21 and 30. 

“This is often because

Read more at: http://mashable.com/2016/11/30/sextortion-webcam-blackmail-tips/

Authorities fear ‘drone-jacking’ with cyber crime on rise

A big rise in drone use is likely to lead to a new wave of “dronejackings” by cyber criminals, security experts warned Tuesday.

A report by Intel’s McAfee Labs said hackers are expected to start targeting drones used for deliveries, law enforcement or camera crews, in addition to hobbyists.

“Drones are well on the way to becoming a major tool for shippers, law enforcement agencies, photographers, farmers, the news media, and more,” said Intel Security’s Bruce Snell, in the company’s annual threat report.

Snell said the concept of dronejacking was demonstrated at a security conference last year, where researchers showed how someone could easily take control of a toy drone.

“Although taking over a kid’s drone may seem amusing and not that big of an issue, once we look at the increase in drone usage potential problems starts to arise,” he said.

The report noted that many consumer drones lack adequate security, which makes it

Read more at: http://dailytimes.com.pk/infotainment/30-Nov-16/authorities-fear-drone-jacking-with-cyber-crime-on-rise