Monthly Archives: September 2017

Young Malaysians ditch dating apps in favour of finding love the old-fashioned way

KUALA LUMPUR (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – Finding love can be just a matter of “swipe right” these days but Malaysia’s Gen Y-ers are still old-fashioned romantics.

Even as dating apps become more common, a survey showed that the technology-obsessed young people in Malaysia prefer to meet their love interests the traditional way – offline.

A mere 7 per cent of youth in Malaysia believe that Tinder is the most conducive way to meet someone new, which is below the global average of 12 per cent.

This is despite each using an average of one dating app, with Tinder being named as the top platform.

The findings emerged from the Truth About Youth survey, conducted by McCann Truth Central of McCann Worldgroup.

The poll gathered the responses of 11,000 youth aged between 16 and 30 across 18 countries. Of the total, 2,000 were from Malaysia.

Some dating app users agreed that they would rather find love through conventional means.

“But

Read more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/young-malaysians-ditch-dating-apps-in-favour-of-finding-love-the-old-fashioned-way

Google: Are you being tracked on internet? Know how to find out …

NEW DELHI: Yes, you are being tracked on internet and several entities are keeping dossier on you. It is so common that you must have found that out yourself. Google does it all the time and so do your social media sites. While this kind of tracking is for commercial purposes such as showing you ads that you would be interested in, you can also be tracked by cyber criminals which can result in harm or serious breach of privacy.

Google knows your every move on the web
Google knows a lot about you. Why? What does Google gain by tracking the activities of its users? Quite simply, Google earns money by doing so. A large part of Google’s revenue is based on advertisements and the impressions they gain through users. So, the Google way of advertising is quite simply showing

Read more at: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/internet/are-you-being-tracked-on-internet-know-how-to-find-out/articleshow/60890696.cms

Are you being tracked on internet? Know how to find out

NEW DELHI: Yes, you are being tracked on internet and several entities are keeping dossier on you. It is so common that you must have found that out yourself. Google does it all the time and so do your social media sites. While this kind of tracking is for commercial purposes such as showing you ads that you would be interested in, you can also be tracked by cyber criminals which can result in harm or serious breach of privacy.

Google knows your every move on the web
Google knows a lot about you. Why? What does Google gain by tracking the activities of its users? Quite simply, Google earns money by doing so. A large part of Google’s revenue is based on advertisements and the impressions they gain through users. So, the Google way of advertising is quite simply showing

Read more at: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/tech/internet/are-you-being-tracked-on-internet-know-how-to-find-out/articleshow/60890696.cms

Emily Osment Speaks Out About Cyber-Bullying & Mental Health: ‘Think Before You Speak’

Emily Osment, like many celebrities, has responded to the controversial Netflix series 13 Reasons Why — and she has a lot to say.

“I watched a few episode of ’13 Reasons Why’ this week and it reminded my of my own journey shooting Cyberbully in Montreal at nineteen,” she shared on Twitter.

“It was a grueling and emotional six weeks that will never leave me as long as I live. I went to work every day and sunk myself into a sorrow hole because I felt it was the only way to truly depict depression. I had to live it, and pulling myself out at the end was incredibly challenging, but ultimately a supremely rewarding experience.”

The Young Hungry actress then pivots to talking about bullying itself.

“Cyber-bullying doesn’t have an age limit,

Read more at: http://www.justjaredjr.com/2017/09/29/emily-osment-speaks-out-about-cyber-bullying-mental-health-think-before-you-speak/

Child abuse online: How sexual predators extort teens

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Privacy and security precautions on the Dark Web haven’t kept authorities from making arrests.
Nate Chute/IndyStar

This is how an online predator sets his trap. 

“He messaged me, flirting with me.” 

“It started out innocent enough, but then it got more and more sexual, and they ended up asking for pictures.”

“I know I didn’t have to, but I felt obligated to return the favor.”

“After I didn’t want to continue sending pictures, he threatened to create a Facebook page with my nudes.”

Chatting. Flirting. Preying on insecurities.

Caught!

These excerpts of victim

Read more at: http://www.indystar.com/story/news/crime/2017/09/29/child-abuse-online-sexual-predators-extort-teens-sextortion/617196001/

Tech Tent: Alexa speaks louder

Rory Cellan-Jones

  • Stream or download the latest Tech Tent podcast
  • Listen to previous episodes on the BBC website
  • Listen live every Friday at 15:00 BST on the BBC World Service

We were promised jetpacks, we ended up with 140 characters. That’s the cynical take on how Silicon Valley’s dreams of life-changing innovations ended up producing something as mundane as Twitter.

Mind you, in the week that Twitter gave us 280 characters – a dubious advance – Tech Tent does indeed bring you the personal jetpack, or at least a competition to build one.

We also hear about Amazon’s latest ambitions for its Alexa virtual assistant, and discuss the growth of ransomware as a major cyber-security threat with

Read more at: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41441454

Cyber Security News Roundup: Sonic, Android, Linux and a task force

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The blind leading the blind on Cyber Security

It’s been another busy week in Cyber Security. We’ve got everything from Android security advice to a high risk Linux Kernel that needs to be patched immediately. We’ve also got a good one about a Dark Web drug lord that got arrested attending an event that I didn’t even know existed, or could exist, before this week began.

But the story that interests me the most is what we’ll lead off with. The blind leading the

Read more at: https://www.thesslstore.com/blog/cyber-security-news-roundup-9-29/

Cryptocurrencies a headache for police

Experts have warned the UK police force does not have the knowledge or expertise to handle a huge increase in criminal opportunities triggered by cryptocurrencies.

Phillip Ariss of the Digital Research Unit at the East Midlands Special Operations Unit said fraudsters adopted bitcoin early on and regularly used it to demand payments.

“A year and a half ago, we had very little experience but since then there has been a huge spike in the use of ransomware,” he said during a Fraud Advisory Panel discussion.

“Now every investigation involves cryptocurrencies.”

For example, when the Wannacry ransomware effected computers worldwide in May, victims were asked to pay between $300 (£224.34) and $600 in the digital currency to regain access to their files.

Three months later the hackers removed from the victims’ online wallets all the bitcoins they had bought.

Ariss said cryptocurrencies facilitated money

Read more at: http://economia.icaew.com/en/news/september-2017/cryptocurrencies-a-headache-for-police

2017, the year when cybercrime hit close to home

The past 12 months have seen a number of unprecedented cyber-attacks in terms of their global scale, impact and rate of spread. Already causing widespread public concern, these attacks only represent a small sample of the wide array of cyber threats we now face. Europol’s 2017 Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment (IOCTA) identifies the main cybercrime threats and provides key recommendations to address the challenges.

Europol’s Executive Director Rob Wainwright: “The global impact of huge cyber security events such as the WannaCry ransomware epidemic has taken the threat from cybercrime to another level. Banks and other major businesses are now targeted on a scale not seen before and, while Europol and its partners in policing and Industry have enjoyed success in disrupting major criminal syndicates operating online, the collective response is still not good enough. In particular people and companies everywhere must do more to better protect themselves.”

The

Read more at: http://expertlegalreview.com/2017-year-cybercrime-hit-close-home/