Category Archives: Botnets

The FBI Is Disrupting One-Tenth as Many Cyber Crime Rings As In 2015

FBI agents took down or disrupted only about one-tenth as many cyber criminal operations during the 2017 fiscal year as they did three years earlier, according to annual reports.

The number of cyber crime operations that FBI agents dismantled or disrupted fell from nearly 2,500 in fiscal year 2014, the first year reliable records were kept, to just 262 in fiscal year 2017, according to annual audits.

Agents disrupted or dismantled 510 cyber crime operations in fiscal year 2015 and 259 operations in fiscal year 2016, according to the audits.

The FBI missed its own target of 500 disruptions or dismantlements in fiscal years 2016 and 2017, according to the report.

Despite missing that goal, the FBI’s cyber division “made noteworthy progress towards neutralizing global cyber threats,” according to the 2017 report. The bureau also continues

Read more at: http://www.defenseone.com/threats/2018/01/fbi-disrupting-10x-fewer-cyber-crime-rings-2015/145096/?oref=d-channeltop

Raising Our Game: Cyber Security in an Age of Digital Transformation

Remarks prepared for delivery.

Good morning. It’s great to be here with you, and great to be back here in my hometown. Thank you all for joining us. I want to thank Father McShane and Fordham for continuing to help us bring people together to focus on cyber security.

Let me start by saying how honored I feel to be here representing the men and women of the FBI. The almost 37,000 agents, analysts, and staff I get to work with at Headquarters, in our field offices, and around the world are an extraordinary, dedicated, and quite frankly, inspiring bunch. Not a day goes by that I’m not struck by countless examples of their patriotism, courage, professionalism, and integrity. And I could not be more proud, but also humbled, to stand with them as we face the formidable challenges of today—and tomorrow.

The work of the FBI is complex and hits upon nearly

Read more at: https://www.fbi.gov/news/speeches/raising-our-game-cyber-security-in-an-age-of-digital-transformation

Our top 7 cyber security predictions for 2018

Given what’s happened in 2017 — the Equifax breach, state-sponsored attacks, Russian manipulation of social media, Wannacry, and more phishing scams than we can count — you might not be looking forward to 2018. Breaches will be bigger, hackers will be smarter, and security teams and budgets won’t seem to keep pace.

There is reason to be optimistic, though. Yes, some things will get worse before they get better, but we expect real progress in a few areas. Here’s what we think will happen next year.

 

1. Many, if not most, U.S. companies will not meet GDPR compliance by deadline

Surveys show that U.S. companies subject to the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) are far behind where they need to be to make the May 25 compliance deadline. For some, it might not matter.

Regulators will not audit for GDPR compliance, so companies are vulnerable to fines

Read more at: https://www.networksasia.net/article/our-top-7-cyber-security-predictions-2018.1515331938

Leveraging reconfigurable computing for smarter cybersecurity, part 2

In my last column, I looked at the challenges facing security teams today and, in particular, the need for more intelligent cybersecurity solutions, more powerful cybersecurity appliances and faster response to security incidents. We also looked at how reconfigurable computing solutions are addressing the need for more powerful appliances and enabling faster response to security incidents. In part 2, we will dive deeper into the latest developments in enabling more intelligent and comprehensive cyber security solutions and how reconfigurable computing can make a difference.

The first step in realizing more intelligent cybersecurity solutions is to rely on Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) as a central point of collection, analysis and correlation based on system logs, network information and behavior analysis. Many SIEM solutions now rely on machine learning and artificial intelligence to correlate information from diverse sources and thereby determine the relationship between security incident alarms and the severity

Read more at: https://www.networkworld.com/article/3245412/lan-wan/leveraging-reconfigurable-computing-for-smarter-cybersecurity-part-2.html

iTWire – Warning: Global cyber crime reaches new highs and worse …

The security firm says there were hundreds of online-fraud and hacking incidents this year and its data shows that cyber crime is “more profitable than the global trade in marijuana, cocaine and heroin combined”.

To support its claim, MailGuard points to a new report by European Union cyber intelligence agency, Europol, which says that the steep upward trend in cyber crime points to 2018 being worse still, with cyber crime now the most economically damaging crime category worldwide.

“From the recent revelations about the Uber data-breach scandal to the Netflix scam, this was a busy year for the cyber security industry,” says MailGuard’s Emmanuel Marshall  in a newly posted blog.




“History may well remember the 20-teens

Read more at: https://www.itwire.com/security/81314-warning-global-cybercrime-reaches-new-highs-and-worse-to-come.html

Top 10 cyber crime stories of 2017

Without a doubt, the most significant cyber crime related stories in 2017 were about the first global cyber attacks from WannaCry and NotPetya, which for many individuals and organisations, made the cyber threat real. The potential effect of cyber attacks was graphically illustrated by the impact of WannaCry on the NHS and NotPetya on Danish shipping giant Maersk.

7 cyber security predictions for 2018 | CSO Online

Given what’s happened in 2017 — the Equifax breach, state-sponsored attacks, Russian manipulation of social media, Wannacry, and more phishing scams than we can count — you might not be looking forward to 2018. Breaches will be bigger, hackers will be smarter, and security teams and budgets won’t seem to keep pace.

There is reason to be optimistic, though. Yes, some things will get worse before they get better, but we expect real progress in a few areas. Here’s what we think will happen next year.

1. Many, if not most, U.S. companies will not meet GDPR compliance by deadline

Surveys show that U.S. companies subject to the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) are far

Read more at: https://www.csoonline.com/article/3242866/security/our-top-7-cyber-security-predictions-for-2018.html

Necurs rides 12 million email campaign move up Most Wanted Malware list

email envelope icons

The use of the Necurs botnet to spread Scarab ransomware over the US Thanksgiving holiday helped propel Necurs up several places on Check Point’s Ten Most Wanted Malware list for November.







Necurs pushed out a total of 12 million malicious emails in one morning in late November Check Point reported helping move it from tenth to eight place for the month. The botnet’s use as a distributor for Locky and Globemaster helped it stay relevant, but the fact that Necurs managed to regain some strength as a favored botnet was no surprise to Check Point researchers.

“The re-emergence of the Necurs botnet highlights how malware that may seem to be fading away, doesn’t always disappear or become any less of a threat. Despite Necurs being well known to the security community, hackers are still enjoying lots of success distributing malware with this highly effective infection

Read more at: https://www.scmagazineuk.com/necurs-rides-12-million-email-campaign-move-up-most-wanted-malware-list/article/719156/

How Minecraft Led To The Mirai Botnet

The Mirai botnet that swept through poorly-secured devices last year resulted in unprecedented denial-of-service attacks. At one point, the botnet turned its wrath on security researcher Brian Krebs’ site, resulting in a sustained attack that saw Krebs’ DDoS protection service (Akamai) say it was getting too old for this shit uninterested in providing further protection for this particular user.

The people behind the botnet have just pled guilty to federal charges.

Three men have pleaded guilty to federal cyber-crime charges for launching a cyberattack last year that knocked large parts of the internet offline.

Paras Jha, Josiah White, and Dalton Norman were indicted by an Alaska court in early December, according to documents unsealed Wednesday.

The Justice Dept. released a statement later in the day confirming the news.

Prosecutors accused the hackers of writing and using the Mirai botnet to hijack vulnerable internet-connected devices to launch powerful distributed

Read more at: https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20171214/18385638815/how-minecraft-led-to-mirai-botnet.shtml

Alaska investigators nab 3 in botnet attacks, ‘click fraud’ scam


The men created a botnet, named Mirai, that federal authorities said was used in what are called distributed denial of service, or “DDOS, attacks.

the men released the code to other criminals on the internet once they the FBI was onto them. Components of it have been seen in subsequent security breaches.

In some cases, the Mirai Botnet attacks shut down websites and either slowed or temporarily shut down the upstream internet service providers, Assistant U.S. Attorney Adam Alexander said.

“Those were some of the biggest botnet-based, DDOS attacks that the internet had seen to date, and resulted in pretty serious disruption and damage both here in the United States and abroad,” Alexander said.

In a separate case, two of the conspirators committed “click fraud,” a scam that makes it appear as if thousands of people are clicking on specific online ads.

Since the cost of online

Read more at: https://www.ktoo.org/2017/12/15/alaska-investigators-nab-3-botnet-attacks-click-fraud-scam/