Tag Archives: respond

Protect, defend, respond: Cyber Security and Forensics students on how to combat cyber threats

Why would some­one tar­get me?” Austin Kleineschay, pres­i­dent of the Cyber Secu­rity and Foren­sic Stu­dent Orga­ni­za­tion (CSFSO), said that’s a com­mon ques­tion about cyber­at­tacks. The mes­sage of CSFSO’s annual inter­net secu­rity work­shop: we are all poten­tial tar­gets for hack­ers and cyber criminals.

The “Think Safe, Be Safe,” work­shop focused on secu­rity prob­lems and pos­si­ble solu­tions. It was held Sat­ur­day, Oct. 28, at the Jason R. Carter Sci­ence Edu­ca­tion Cen­ter. Com­mu­nity mem­bers, stu­dents and fac­ulty attended.

Kleineschay opened the event with a dis­cus­sion of cur­rent inter­net secu­rity threats. He chal­lenged every­one to imag­ine what could hap­pen if a cyber crim­i­nal accessed their pho­tos, emails, pass­words, bank accounts and credit card num­bers. Offend­ers might not even be human, as “bots” can find a computer’s secu­rity weak­nesses, Kleineschay said.

Secu­rity bugs will always exist, humans are fal­li­ble,” said Kleineschay. The threat of viruses, worms, Tro­jans, ran­somware and mal­ware

Read more at: http://themetropolitan.metrostate.edu/issue/2017/11/007/

Protect, defend, respond: Cyber Security and Forensics students on how to combat cyber threats

Why would some­one tar­get me?” Austin Kleineschay, pres­i­dent of the Cyber Secu­rity and Foren­sic Stu­dent Orga­ni­za­tion (CSFSO), said that’s a com­mon ques­tion about cyber­at­tacks. The mes­sage of CSFSO’s annual inter­net secu­rity work­shop: we are all poten­tial tar­gets for hack­ers and cyber criminals.

The “Think Safe, Be Safe,” work­shop focused on secu­rity prob­lems and pos­si­ble solu­tions. It was held Sat­ur­day, Oct. 28, at the Jason R. Carter Sci­ence Edu­ca­tion Cen­ter. Com­mu­nity mem­bers, stu­dents and fac­ulty attended.

Kleineschay opened the event with a dis­cus­sion of cur­rent inter­net secu­rity threats. He chal­lenged every­one to imag­ine what could hap­pen if a cyber crim­i­nal accessed their pho­tos, emails, pass­words, bank accounts and credit card num­bers. Offend­ers might not even be human, as “bots” can find a computer’s secu­rity weak­nesses, Kleineschay said.

Secu­rity bugs will always exist, humans are fal­li­ble,” said Kleineschay. The threat of viruses, worms, Tro­jans, ran­somware and mal­ware

Read more at: http://themetropolitan.metrostate.edu/issue/2017/11/007/

Five Steps to Respond to Revenge Porn

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The information and data collected is used to authenticate users and to send notifications relating

Read more at: http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/five-steps-to-respond-to-revenge-porn-30063/

Cyberbullying – understand, respond and prevent

Cyberbullying – when the internet, telephones and other forms of digital technology are used by individuals to threaten, tease, upset or humiliate someone else.

This modern form of bullying has sadly become more prevalent. Whilst it is increasingly becoming a public concern more awareness is needed by society to help address and prevent it.

As with many changes in society, the internet and social media have changed the way bullying occurs. Digital technology enables multiple devices to be used to spread and repeat hurtful and intimidating behaviour. Technological platforms provide cyberbullies with the means to reach a vast audience making it harder to police and punish cyberbullies whose identities are mostly anonymous.

The UK has no legal definition of cyberbullying but it is possible to apply some existing laws to cases of cyberbullying and online harassment. These include the Protection from Harassment Act 1997, the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, the Communications Act

Read more at: http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=eef1da23-2f19-43d1-8cf3-a1f50610abfd

‘Respond promptly to cyber crime complaints’

ADGP Prathap Reddy addresses a gathering at the cybercrime awareness workshop for law enforcement agencies in Mangaluru on Tuesday. City Police Commissioner M Chandra Sekhar, DGP (CID) Kishore Chandra and IGP (Western Range) P Harishekaran look on. DH photo

ADGP Prathap Reddy addresses a gathering at the cybercrime awareness workshop for law enforcement agencies in Mangaluru on Tuesday. City Police Commissioner M Chandra Sekhar, DGP (CID) Kishore Chandra and IGP (Western Range) P Harishekaran look on. DH photo

Read more at: http://www.deccanherald.com/content/614518/respond-promptly-cyber-crime-complaints.html

The aftermath: how should we respond to the implications of WannaCry?

WannaCry paralysed IT systems in 150 countries, including much of the NHS

If security is often a distant issue to the general public, on Friday it must have felt very close indeed. The ransomware attack that paralysed 40 UK hospitals and countless other organisations across 150 countries will not soon be forgotten. After all, what appears to be a relatively unsophisticated and untargeted campaign managed to shut down industry giants and public utilities, including the UK’s National Health Service.

A week ago cyber-security was an issue widely ignored by the general public, government and business – but by Monday there had been a paradigm shift.

If voters, citizens, law enforcers, executives, business owners, bureaucrats, doctors and politicians ignored these problems last week, they couldn’t on Monday morning.

Over the weekend most of the affected NHS trusts returned to full operation and fears of a second attack have

Read more at: https://www.scmagazineuk.com/the-aftermath-how-should-we-respond-to-the-implications-of-wannacry/article/661838/

The aftermath: how should we respond to the implications of …

WannaCry paralysed IT systems in 150 countries, including much of the NHS

If security is often a distant issue to the general public, on Friday it must have felt very close indeed. The ransomware attack that paralysed 40 UK hospitals and countless other organisations across 150 countries will not soon be forgotten. After all, what appears to be a relatively unsophisticated and untargeted campaign managed to shut down industry giants and public utilities, including the UK’s National Health Service.

A week ago cyber-security was an issue widely ignored by the general public, government and business – but by Monday there had been a paradigm shift.

If voters, citizens, law enforcers, executives, business owners, bureaucrats, doctors and politicians ignored these problems last week, they couldn’t on Monday morning.

Over the weekend most of the affected NHS trusts returned to full operation and fears of a second attack have

Read more at: https://www.scmagazineuk.com/the-aftermath-how-should-we-respond-to-the-implications-of-wannacry/article/661838/